PRIZM+ : Pocket Spectrophotometer

TestRight, an IIT Delhi startup is working on the development of portable testing gadgets and has already developed the country’s first pocket spectrophotometer, Prizm+. Patent on this is still awaited. TestRight has won prestigious awards including 'BioAsia 2018' and 'Vibrant Gujarat' and has been featured in 'Economic Times' and 'Chemical Today'. It is among the top startups selected to showcase at BIO International Convention 2018 in Boston.

The CEO of TestRight Shubham Rathore talks to Dr Vanita Srivastava about the company.

What motivated you to start this startup?

 

The genesis of TestRight was the result of a conversation with a dairy farmer articulating his problem about unstable payment system for milk which was based on its fat content. It was realized that we are lacking even the basic technology to help people assess the quality of the materials of daily transaction. Adulteration and counterfeit materials are cluttering the market - be it food, textile, etc. We therefore decided to develop easy to use devices which can help anyone to assess the quality of the materials.

 

What help did you get from IITD?

 

IIT Delhi incubation center helped us to speed up our R&D efforts by providing us with a pool of resources including high-end instruments and rapid prototyping tools. Easy access to the labs inside the campus for quick validation of our technology and media coverage has benefitted us to a great extent.

 

What were the major challenges?

 

Working in the hardware sector is always challenging as most of the raw materials have to be imported, which consumes time and money. Thus, any minor mistake leads to cost and time penalties. Further, finding good fabricators is not only expensive but hard to find.

 

What is the roadmap ahead?

 

We will be providing the device to the educational institutes and disseminating the commercial applications of the Prizm+ in water and soil testing, diagnostics, and food testing. Further, we will tie up with foreign partners to realize a simple point-and-shoot device which can tell you the chemical composition of any material by simply shining a laser light on it.

 

Can you brief about the technology?

 

Prizm uses a patent-pending optical train to fold the optics into a tiny pack. Interestingly, there are no moving parts or heating lamps in the system which makes the device very rugged to use for both outsides and inside the lab. Prizm is the first device of its kind to have smartphone connectivity for quick display and sharing of data and need no other battery source or power supply.